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How did Hurricane Florence and Tropical Storm Michael Impact Living Shorelines? Read Part I of the Living Storm Protection Series Part II: Monitoring the Performance and Resilience of Marsh Sill Living Shorelines

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The border between North Carolina and Virginia - a line that runs from east to west – seems logical when viewed on a map. But this straight line also divides five river basins, three of which – the Pasquotank, Roanoke, and Chowan - flow into Albemarle Sound. While a state border doesn’t stop the flow of water, it does complicate efforts to coordinate what happens upstream, in Virginia, with the downstream health of North Carolina’s estuaries and sounds.

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map

APNEP is excited to announce that an interactive map of funded projects from 2012 through 2018 is now available on our website! Through this ArcGIS Online-based map, APNEP hopes to showcase the diverse and innovative projects we’ve funded throughout the watershed, as well as to provide our partners and the public with information about those initiatives.

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epa visit

APNEP is proud to be one of twenty-eight “estuaries of national significance” across the United States that belong to the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuary Program (NEP). As part of the National Estuary Program, APNEP’s progress towards achieving its long-term goals is assessed every five years by EPA representatives through a formal Program Evaluation. This May 15th through 17th, APNEP staff and EPA representatives traveled across the Albemarle-Pamlico region for the site visit portion of the Program Evaluation.

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trish with a fish

In contrast to livestock or agricultural crops, North Carolina’s coastal fish, shellfish, and crustaceans are considered public trust resources, meaning that they belong to all the people of the state. To ensure that these resources will continue to provide jobs and delicious seafood far into the future, a balance must be struck between harvesting by commercial and recreational fishermen and protections that allow these species to grow into adulthood and reproduce – no easy feat in a system as complicated as our estuaries and coasts.

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dam

With the demolition of Raleigh’s Milburnie Dam in November 2017, the Neuse River now flows freely from Falls Lake to Pamlico Sound for the first time in over a hundred years. Safety concerns contributed to the dam’s removal, but the main reason for the removal of Milburnie was to enable fish such as American Shad, Striped Bass, and Atlantic Sturgeon to once again migrate from the ocean to their historic spawning habitat upstream of the dam.  

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This program awards grants that support community-driven projects designed to engage, educate, and empower communities to better understand local environmental and public health issues and develop strategies for addressing those issues, building consensus in the community, and setting community priorities. The EJSG program will award approximately $1.5 million nationwide for this competitive opportunity. EPA anticipates awarding approximately 50 grants (5 per EPA region) of up to $30,000 each. These grants are for one-year projects. Get detailed information

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